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Last updated 25 May 2017

Frequently Asked Questions – ePIP

A shared health summary can be created and uploaded to an individual’s My Health Record by the individual’s nominated healthcare provider which could be either: A Registered Medical Practitioner; A Registered Nurse; or An Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner. A shared health summary can be created at the time of consultation or afterwards if more convenient for the healthcare professional. A good time to create a shared health summary is when the nominated healthcare provider is completing a patient’s health assessment, for example a GP management plan, 75+ health assessment, 4 year-old health check or flu vaccination. A shared health summary should also be created for an individual any time there is a clinically relevant event that other healthcare providers who may be involved in the individual’s care may benefit from knowing (for example, new prescribed medications or dosages, new medical conditions). Any updates to an individual’s shared health summary will require a new shared health summary to be created. This can be done quickly and easily from most clinical information systems. The updated shared health summary will appear as the most recent shared health summary in the in the individual’s My Health Record.
There is a distinction between authoring and uploading information. To author a shared health summary in the My Health Record system, a healthcare professional needs to have a Healthcare Provider Identifier-Individual (HPI-I) and be the individual’s nominated healthcare provider. These can be either: A Registered Medical Practitioner A Registered Nurse An Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner Any authorised employee in the registered healthcare organisation can upload shared health summaries. This can include practice nurses.
The quality of clinical records is the responsibility and choice of the authoring healthcare provider. Practice level protocols and professional standards for data quality apply to all clinical records, including those uploaded to the My Health Record. The RACGP Standards for General Practice provide guidance on data quality for general practice clinical records, which include digital health records.
No, as the incentive is practice based and based on the patient load of a practice, the targets must be met overall by the practice under a single PIP Practice ID. How the minimum upload target will be met in a practice is up to the discretion of the practice. The minimum upload requirement could be met by one, some or all GPs within a General Practice contributing the total required number of shared health summaries per quarter.
Most clinical information software contains the functionality to provide assisted registration for individuals. Practices may wish to offer assisted registration to increase the number of patients they have registered with the My Health Record system, or to encourage their patients to self-register or contact the My Health Record hotline on 1800 723 471.
Some general practice consultation MBS item descriptors already include the ability to curate and upload documents to the My Health Record as part of a consultation within the item descriptor. Specifically, under MBS General Practitioner attendance items GPs can account for the time taken to prepare shared health summaries and event summaries for a My Health Record, if the activities are undertaken with any form of patient history taking and/or other clinically relevant activities form part of a consultation. These activities are considered to be part of the documentation for treatment of the patient and count towards the calculation of consultation time for billing if they also align with the complexity associated with the billing code selected. Please note that patients do not need to be present at the time of uploading the shared health summary, however activity taken outside of a broader patient clinical consultation cannot be claimed under the MBS.
There is no obligation to update a shared health summary. A shared health summary provides a snapshot summary of an individual’s health at a point in time only. However, an individual’s nominated healthcare provider would be expected to upload a new shared health summary when clinically appropriate.
Authoring shared health summaries There is a distinction between authoring and uploading information. Only healthcare providers with a Healthcare Provider Identifier-Individual (HPI-I) can author something that is uploaded to the My Health Record system, or in the case of shared health summaries only nominated healthcare providers can author them; however any authorised employee in the registered organisation can upload shared health summaries.
Every day one in five Australian GPs see a patient for whom they have no information. A shared health summary provides a snapshot summary of an individual’s health at a point in time and the most recently uploaded shared health summary in a patient’s My Health Record is likely to be the first document accessed by another healthcare professional. Having a shared health summary in an individual’s My Health Record can assist that individual to receive better care when they need to see other healthcare professionals. Patients considered to benefit most from having a shared health summary include: those with chronic or complex conditions; people living with disabilities; patients who see multiple healthcare providers; patients with allergies and/or adverse reactions; transient patients; and child and maternal health patients. Practices are encouraged to consider prioritising shared health summary uploads for these patients.

Last updated 28 April 2016